Image Gallery

 

A selection of images from our books

Mouse Retina

Mouse Retina

A laser scanning, or "confocal," microscope scans a sample point-by-point or line-by-line at once, assembling the pixel information to generate one image. This allows for a very high-resolution and high-contrast image in three dimensions. The image shown here is from a laser scanning microscope of a mouse retina, where the cells have been stained with fluorescent dye to show different features. Credit: National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)

Light Bulbs in X-ray Light

Light Bulbs in X-ray Light

In this piece of art, light bulbs were placed in a medical X-ray machine. The artist then added color to the individual light bulbs to create the desired effect. Dr. Paula Fontaine/www.RadiantArtStudios.com

Shadows

Shadows

Lightning over Quebec

Lightning over Quebec

In massive storm clouds, the friction between large particles composed of many atoms builds up a large separation of electric charge and creates voltages approaching 100 million volts. When the voltage becomes this large, it can cause an explosive electric discharge observed as a lightning bolt. The heat generated during a lightning strike is hotter than the surface of the Sun, and this heat is the source of the brilliant white-blue flash that we see. Credit: Jp Marquis

Lensed Sun

Lensed Sun

The particles in the Earth's atmosphere bends the path that light takes as it travels from the near vacuum of space into the relatively thick layer that surrounds our planet. Because the rays of light from the Sun must travel through more of the atmosphere as it nears the horizon, the image of the Sun gets distorted. Credit: U.S. Navy photo by Cmdr. Ed Thompson

Sunset

Sunset

At sunrise and sunset, light from the Sun must take a much longer path through the Earth's atmosphere than it does during the middle part of the day. This means more of the blue and indigo light of sunlight is scattered away because these shorter wavelengths of visible light are more affected by air molecules in the atmosphere. This often allows more of the red and orange light to reach the Earth's surface. Credit: Richard F Staples, Jr.

Sun Halo

Sun Halo

When sunlight passes through ice crystals in cirrus clouds in the Earth's atmosphere, the refraction of sunlight by the ice crystals can create an optical phenomenon known as a 22-degree halo. Most of the halos appear as bright white rings, but sometimes the ice crystals act as tiny prisms and the halo will be tinged with various colors. Credit: Lars0001/Wikimedia Commons

Northern Lights

Northern Lights

Streams of particles with electric charge are continually leaving the Sun and traveling through the Solar System. As these particles approach the Earth, some of them are channeled by the planet's magnetic field toward the North and South poles where they collide with atoms in the Earth's atmosphere. This produces the famous light shows we call auroras. Credit: US Air Force, Senior Airman Joshua Strang

Lasers & Space

Lasers & Space

This image shows one innovative use of lasers. By beaming a laser into the sky, astronomers can measure and then compensate for the blurring effects of the Earth's atmosphere, allowing for clearer images of distant cosmic objects. Credit: ESO/B. Tafreshi (twanight.org)

Earth at Night

Earth at Night

Without the light from the Sun shining upon it, our Earth appears like a dark disk. This shroud of darkness falls every 24 hours as the Earth spins on its axis. The Sun's light rises in the east and eventually fades below the horizon in the west, ushering in night. Credit: NASA

Sunset from Orbit

Sunset from Orbit

Despite being 93 million miles from the Earth, the Sun delivers approximately 5 trillion giga-joules of energy to the Earth's surface every year. This is a tremendous amount of energy. In fact, if we could harness just one day's worth of the Sun's energy that reaches us, we could power the entire planet's energy needs for seven decades. Credit: NASA/JSC

Our Sun

Our Sun

When we look at the Sun from the surface on the Earth, it typically looks yellow to us because it gives off its most intense radiation in that color of visible light. However, if we observe the Sun in the "other" types of light that it emits, we are exposed to an entirely different looking object. Here we see the Sun in ultraviolet light through a telescope with better resolution than the most sophisticated high-definition television. Credit: NASA/SDO

Cassiopeia A

Cassiopeia A

One of the most famous bodies in the night sky is the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant. This object was created when a massive star ran out of fuel and exploded, hurtling its outer layers into space at millions of miles per hour. Because this material has been superheated, it glows brightly in X-ray light that is more energetic than what humans can see with their eyes. Credit: NASA/CXC/SAO

NGC 602

NGC 602

This image combines three different types of light to give us this spectacular view of this neighboring galaxy to the Milky Way. In this view of the so-called Small Magellanic Cloud (named after Ferdinand Magellan), X-ray light is purple, infrared light is red, and optical light is red, green, and blue. Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Univ. Potsdam/L. Oskinova et al.; Optical: NASA/STScI; Infrared: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Center of the Milky Way

Center of the Milky Way

This image of the center of our Milky Way galaxy combines data from three NASA observatories. X-rays from the Chandra X-ray Observatory are blue and violet, near-infrared emission from Hubble is yellow, and the Spitzer Space Telescope infrared data are red. Observations using infrared light and X-ray light see through the obscuring dust to reveal the intense activity near the galactic core. X-ray: NASA/CXC/UMass/D. Wang et al.; Optical: NASA/ESA/STScI/D.Wang et al.; IR: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSC